A female badger has died after being found heavily entangled in a snare and barbed wire.

The adult female badger was found in the Lampeter area and was believed to have been trapped for a few days.

Badger snare Lampeter March18 pic1RSPCA animal collection officer (ACO) Ellie West said: “The badger was very tangled up at the bottom of some fencing. There was no way the badger could have escaped, but luckily I was able to cut all wire and take the badger immediately to an independent vets.

“The badger was sedated and during the examination the vet found that the snare had become totally embedded into her stomach. There was infection and was very swollen and sore and it is likely that the badger had been there for at least three days.

“Sadly, to prevent further suffering the vet decided that the kindest thing to do was to put the badger to sleep.

“This incident really does highlight the cruel and indiscriminate nature of snares.”

The device was not a self-locking snare, which are illegal, but it was not set in accordance with the Welsh Government’s Code of Practice regarding snare use. Furthermore, it is offence to trap badgers with snares under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 , and it is an offence to injure, kill or take a badger, under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 except under licence.

It is a legal requirement that snares be checked at least once a day, yet from the severity of the injuries caused to a lot of animals it seems that many people do not follow even this minimal requirement.

Badger snare Lampeter March18 pic2The RSPCA is opposed to the manufacture, sale and use of all snares and any trap which causes suffering. Snares are cruel and indiscriminate in what they catch. About 40 percent of snared animals are not the intended target species.

Anyone with relevant information is urged to contact the RSPCA’s inspectorate appeal line on 0300 123 8018. All calls are treated in confidence.

Never try to free an animal from a snare or trap – you risk hurting yourself and the animal and it could be an offence if the animal was legally caught. Stay back to avoid stressing the animal and call us with the location on our 24-hour emergency line 0300 1234 999. More advice is available on our website at www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/wildlife/injuredanimals.

If you wish to help RSPCA Cymru rescue animals such as this, you can donate online. The RSPCA is a charity and rely on public donations.