A 37-year-old man from Nelson, Lancashire has been arrested under the Animal Welfare Act after an RSPCA appeal for information. The dog has been seized by police and taken into RSPCA care.

 

On Monday (14 December) we released footage of a man repeatedly punching a large white dog on Hendon Road and made an urgent appeal for information to find him and the dog, who we were extremely concerned about.

 

Following tip offs from members of the public over the last 48 hours, RSPCA inspector Charlotte Booker, a police officer from Lancashire Police and the Pendle dog warden conducted a joint operation this morning (Wednesday 16 December).

 

The man is now at a local police station and will be interviewed by the RSPCA, who are leading the investigation..

 

The dog – an adult bull terrier type – has been checked over by a vet and is doing well. She is now in RSPCA care.

 

RSPCA inspector Booker said: “The response we have had from the public over the past 48 hours has been absolutely huge and we are very grateful to everyone who has shared our appeal, and who has been in touch with the information we needed.

 

“The same name was given to us many times so we were able to verify information quickly.

 

“I’d also like to thank Lancashire Police and the Pendle dog warden for their help in today’s operation.”

 

The appeal was viewed 3.5 million times on Facebook, shared more than 16,000 times and generated over 10,700 comments from concerned animal-lovers.

 

“Whilst we understand that people will want more information, this is now an active investigation so we can’t say any more at this time,” explained RSPCA inspector Booker.

 

Lancashire Police PC Keates said: “We understand that this is an emotive subject but we urge restraint and request that names and addresses are not banded about on social media as this may jeopardise any future prosecution or more importantly any penalty.

“A massive thankyou to all those that helped by providing information.”

 

If you would like to help the RSPCA, you can give £3 now by texting HELP to 78866 (text costs £3 + one standard network rate message). We are a charity and rely on public donations to exist.