COULD you offer a forever home for a guinea pig?

RSPCA Bryn-y-Maen Animal Centre in Upper Colwyn Bay is looking for homes for several guinea pigs that all have their own characters.

BertCentre manager Victoria Williams said Bert the guinea pig is a curious little fellow.

“He is a lively and active lad and came into the centre through no fault of his own,” she said

“He would require a large cage and access to an exercise pen indoors, or a hutch and secure run outdoors for the warm weather.

“Although he is on his own Bert could possibly be very slowly introduced to another guinea pig, but this is yet to be tried. Bert is such a charming boy and would really appreciate a new start in life.”

The centre is also appealing for homes for Saturn and Pluto.

“These two are active, chatty young guinea pigs who are looking for a loving home with plenty of space to live and play,” she said.

Pluto and Saturn (l-r)“They will need a daily grooming session and the occasional trim to keep their long locks looking good. Although quick movers, they love a cuddle on your lap.

“They have been fostered in an indoor environment so are accustomed to household activities. They will require a large indoor cage plus access to an indoor run, or a large hutch and secure run for warm weather.”

For more information about owning and caring for a guinea pig please visit http://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/rodents/guineapigs

If you think you can offer any of these guinea pigs the fresh start they are looking for then please get in touch to with the Bryn-y-Maen animal centre on 0300 123 0745 or at brynymaen@rspca.org.uk.

The centre is open between 11am and 4pm everyday, except Wednesdays.

If you would like to help the RSPCA, you can give £3 now by texting HELP to 78866 (text costs £3 + one standard network rate message). We are a charity and rely on public donations to exist.Bert

Guinea pig Factfile
Guinea pigs, or ‘cavies’, are social animals with a compact, rounded body shape, short legs and no tail.
They originate from the grasslands and lower slopes of the Andes Mountains in South America. Guinea pigs are active up to 20 hours per day and sleep only for short periods.
Guinea pigs are social animals. In the wild they live in close family groups of 5 – 10 individuals, though several groups may live in close proximity to form a colony.
Guinea pigs’ diet needs to be supplemented with plenty of vitamin C, as they lack the enzyme needed to synthesise vitamin C and can only store vitamin C for short periods.