The RSPCA Leybourne Animal Centre near West Malling, Kent, is desperately seeking new homes for 11 cats including a rather dashing cat named Depp.

 

Some of the centre’s cats recently had a virus called calicivirus.  This is a virus that normally causes mouth sores and cold like symptoms and only showed up in the animals after they had had anaesthetics, for example for neutering.

 

Staff now need to disinfect and deep clean the whole cattery but they can’t … Continue reading…

The RSPCA and fire service carried out a dramatic sheep rescue on Sunday (27 January) after the animals became stranded near to the B4381 in Welshpool.

 

The 32 sheep were on a flood plain and were stranded when the River Severn burst its banks overnight.  As waters rose, 20 of the sheep managed to find a patch of higher ground next to a river bridge but the other 12 were balancing about 200 yards away on a hedge line…. Continue reading…

The RSPCA is warning about the dangers of careless use of antifreeze after a vet reported five cats had been poisoned in the same road in Sevenoaks in Kent.

 

RSPCA inspector Andrew Kirby said: “Five cases of suspected antifreeze poisoning in the same road in the space of a week suggests someone has been careless with antifreeze and spilled some or put some out deliberately.”

 

Two cats have died, one has been put to sleep and two more … Continue reading…

A moorhen, who got tangled in some fishing line on a lake in Colchester, Essex, has had a lucky escape.

 

RSPCA animal collection officer  Donna Green took a call about a distressed bird trying to free itself from some fishing line on an island in the middle of a fishing lake on the Greenstead estate.

She said: “There was fishing line caught in a tree and the bird was hanging upside down by its legs.

 

“It had been … Continue reading…

The East Norfolk branch of the RSPCA wants to encourage more people to support them with a regular donation.

Last year, the branch rehomed nearly 200 animals including almost 160 cats, 13 dogs and nine  rabbits.

The vast majority of those were brought in by inspectors because they had been abandoned, or were injured or had been ill-treated.

Taking care of traumatised animals is very costly, as they often need a lot of time and patience as well as medical … Continue reading…